LOOK BEFORE YOU LANYARD

lanyard

Lately, I’ve taken to wearing a lanyard around my neck, which holds my keys and a series of store tags from the places where I usually shop. Since I began this practice I have not lost my keys once! Until today, it has been a lifesaver. However, while checking out of Ace hardware this morning, when the cashier asked for my tag, I held up the ACE one for him to scan. Without looking, he grabbed it—not realizing that it was attached to me—and almost pulled me across the counter. “Whoa there,” I said, “or you’ll have me in your lap.” Poor kid was horrified. The incident set me thinking about the ways we try to protect ourselves but don’t always do so. Some recent cases in the news come to mind:

  1. Should I still be taking Omega-3 supplements? New information says this is not always a good idea as it can cause blood thinning and excessive bleeding among other issues.
  2. Should I be eating gluten free? New studies show that unless you have certified celiac disease, you might be causing more harm than good. You may even be increasing your risk of heart disease. They’ve also discovered that gluten is a good prebiotic that actually feeds the ‘good’ bacteria in our gut.
  3. It’s on ads all over TV, but is Prevagen really a safe drug to take for a sharper mind?   Um, nope. Not according to the science.
  4. Should I be slathering myself with conventional sunscreens? Um, not unless I want the chemicals in them going smack into my bloodstream and liver.
  5. Are routine dental x-rays really no big deal? They always tell you that the ‘radiation exposure is minimal,’ but do you realize that if you don’t insist on a lead, shield collar for your neck, you can actually fry your thyroid and end up with hypothyroidism or cancer?

So what’s the takeaway? I guess that it’s, still, after more than 2,000 years, just what the Greek poet, Hesiod advised us in 700 BC: “all things in moderation.” Otherwise, the apparently helpful things we think we are doing might ultimately cause more harm than good.  Or, like me, you could end up in a strangers’ lap simply because you didn’t want to lose your keys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 thoughts on “LOOK BEFORE YOU LANYARD

  1. Well said, Helen. Nothing beats good old fashioned moderation and common sense. And what smart person wouldn’t want you in their lap? You are adorable you know!

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  2. Odd about gluten because when I eat it I get so totally constipated I have to take a cathartic and that may no work for 24 hours. Don’t think that is accurate, and perhaps put out by the people that are upset people are avoiding wheat, especially.

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    • Although the best sources of prebiotins are derived from plants such as onions, leeks, garlic, and artichokes, most Americans get their prebiotics from cereal grains. And that’s where people on a gluten-free diet need to be careful since they omit most grain products.

      Without prebiotics, the beneficial bacteria do not receive enough of the food sources they need to thrive. Digestion may suffer. The body may have trouble absorbing nutrients properly. It may also have trouble warding off bad bacteria such as E.coli when colonies of beneficial bacteria fall. What you eat directly and indirectly affects your overall health, including the health of your gut.

      The health of your gut bacteria directly impacts your overall well-being, too, creating a cycle of interdependence that, if disrupted, can cause health problems. Therefore, people embarking on a celiac disease diet, gluten-free diet or leaky-gut diet that drastically reduces or omits all gluten-containing foods must be especially conscious of what they eat. They need to consider including supplementation to ensure they receive enough prebiotics in the diet.

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